Central Corridor Blogs to Follow

July 12, 2012

The Central Corridor is a multi-faceted stretch that is changing quickly as LRT construction continues.  Two people who know it well are introducing others to daily life on the Corridor.  These two Central Corridor residents – John Bailey and Christina Morrison – have been taking their daily experiences with LRT construction and turning them into entertaining and informative blog posts.  John Bailey’s blog, Green Line Gems focuses on small business and restaurants along the corridor and Christina Morrison’s Let There Be Light Rail blog chronicles her experiences living, working and commuting on the corridor.  The Funders Collaborative asked each author a few questions about their blog and why they do it:        

GREEN LINE GEMSJohn Bailey

Describe your “Green Line Gems” blog
Green Line Gems is my small attempt to highlight the many fine small businesses along University Avenue and the whole Green Line corridor between Union Depot and Target Field.

Why did you start it?
I live in Hamline Midway and so I knew this would be a tough construction season for many of the businesses along University. It seemed like the perfect time to turn people on to the many businesses I love to frequent in hopes that more people will patronize those places.

Why do you keep doing it?
It justifies my interest in eating out.

What are you most looking forward to about the opening of the Green Line?
The enhanced mobility and opportunity to get to more places and do more things without driving.

What other blogs and/or news sources do you follow?
I like the Let There Be Light Rail blog, and MinnPost has done some good writing about the corridor.

LET THERE BE LIGHT RAIL – Christina Morrison

Describe your “Let There Be Light Rail” blog
The blog documents my personal experience of Central Corridor light rail construction, and of living and commuting along University Avenue.

Why did you start it?
I actually work as a transportation planner for Saint Paul, and Central Corridor has been my primary focus since 2006. It's a complex and challenging project to say the least – there is always more work to be done. In some ways, I needed an outlet to be excited, frustrated, confused, and most importantly, to  enjoy the progress. I can do that at home (or on the bus) better than when I'm at work. Even though I spend all day working on LRT, I keep the blog separate – it's personal. In fact, early on, a friend from college said "I read this LRT blog – you would love it!" It took me a few minutes to convince him that I write the blog. 

Why do you keep doing it?
I am on the bus for over an hour every day, so I have lots of time to write. I'm kind of a reluctant blogger, but I am constantly amazed by what I see out there. It's unbelievable how much humor there is in construction. I remember one day I was walking across a temporary pedestrian bridge and cut my foot open. As I hobbled along, feeling incredibly pathetic, I passed a sign (for Gremlin Theatre's production) that read "Little Shop of Horrors – ENTER" with an arrow pointing across the construction zone. I stood there, foot bleeding, tears streaming, laughing about the whole scene.

What are you most looking forward to about the opening of the Green Line? 
Every step feels monumental – pulling track, stations coming out of the ground, seeing the signs go up. Right now, I'm really looking forward to seeing our first trains delivered this fall. But more than anything, I just can't wait to ride the train everyday.

What other blogs and/or news sources do you follow?
I get most of my everyday news from radio (MPR) and Twitter. I tend to read every article in The Line because it has stuff I don't see anywhere else. My favorite transit blogs are Bus Chick (anyone who rides a bus in any city should read this), The Overhead Wire (for transit "space race" gossip) and Transport Politic (for serious, worldwide transit news). 

 

We would like to know what you think!  Who do you follow and where do you get your news on the Corridor?  Let us know at info@funderscollaborative.org